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Nationals’ DJ Herz blasts past Marlins with 13 strikeouts for first MLB win

South Florida Local News - Sat, 06/15/2024 - 15:30

By PATRICK STEVENS (Associated Press)

WASHINGTON (AP) — DJ Herz struck out 13 and allowed one hit over six innings for his first major league victory, combining on a four-hitter that led the Washington Nationals over the Miami Marlins 4-0 Saturday.

Joey Meneses and Lane Thomas homered for Washington, which has won seven of eight overall and improved to 6-0 against Miami this year.

Herz (1-1), a 23-year-old left-hander who made his major league debut June 4, walked none. He struck out eight of his first 10 batters and his total was the second-highest by a Nationals rookie since the team moved to Washington for 2005, trailing only Stephen Strasburg’s 14 in his debut on June 8, 2010.

“I think that was probably my best game I’ve ever pitched,” said Herz, who did not make it out of the fifth inning in his first two starts. “To do it at this level, it’s a great feeling.”

Miami lost its fourth straight game and dropped to 2-10 in June. The Marlins are an NL-worst 23-47 and are 24 games under .500 for the first time this season. They are 3-22 when facing left-handed starters.

Miami didn’t have a runner until Jake Burger’s leadoff single in the fifth. Herz retired his final six batters, striking out five. He struck out the side in the third and the sixth innings and hopped off the mound with excitement after getting Miami’s Tim Anderson for the third time to finish his outing.

“I was very pleased with the 18 outs he gave us,” Washington manager Dave Martinez said. “That’s part of it. He had 84 pitches. We could have sent him back out there, but I thought he did a great job.”

Herz struck out 68.4% of the batters he faced.

“When you can throw the fastball at the top for a strike and then tunnel it off the changeup, it’s difficult to hit,” Miami manager Skip Schumaker said. “We did not hit the fastball, so if you’re not hitting the fastball and then you’re early on the changeup, it’s tough to hit. He had a really good day.”

Dylan Floro worked a 1-2-3 seventh, Hunter Harvey escaped a bases-loaded jam in the eighth, and Kyle Finnegan worked around Burger’s two-out triple in the ninth.

Thomas doubled in the first and scored on Meneses’ sacrifice fly, then homered in the third off Trevor Rogers (1-8), who allowed two runs and six hits in seven innings — his longest outing since June 10, 2021.

Thomas has six homers — he hit 28 last year — and went deep in back-to-back games for the first time this season. He hit 28 home runs last year.

Meneses added a two-run homer off Andrew Nardi in the eighth.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Marlins: RHP Bryan Hoeing (hamstring strain) struck out two in two scoreless innings in a rehabilitation appearance Friday for Class A Jupiter. … Miami selected the contract of LHP Kent Emanuel from Jacksonville and optioned RHP Shaun Anderson to the Triple-A team.

Nationals: Winker left the game in the third with a right knee injury sustained while running the bases two innings earlier and was to have an MRI. … Washington signed OF Harold Ramírez to a minor league contract and assigned him to Triple-A Rochester, a day after Tampa Bay released him. Ramírez hit .268 with a homer and 13 RBIs for the Rays this season. … RHP Cade Cavalli (Tommy John surgery) threw a two-inning bullpen session.

UP NEXT

Washington rookie LHP Mitchell Parker (4-3, 3.21 ERA), who has yet to allow more than three earned runs in any of his 11 starts, faces Miami LHP Jesús Luzardo (3-5, 5.11) as the three-game series concludes Sunday.

___

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/mlb

Daily Horoscope for June 15, 2024

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 21:00
General Daily Insight for June 15, 2024

We’re moving along at a gentle pace today, with no need to rush or worry. The Moon is in Libra, speaking up about the rewards of aiming for a steady middle ground, rather than trying to rock the boat just for laughs or pressing buttons to cause a reaction. Our words carry extra weight while the Sun and Mercury continue to waltz through Gemini, so there’s no need for us to keep our kind thoughts to ourselves. Communication can work wonders.

Aries

March 21 – April 19

Life’s current benefits can be maximized by being open with others. The Moon is tumbling through your relationship sector, encouraging you to double up in the name of whatever you choose, be it personal fun or enjoyable business. The Sun and Mercury are still moving in close alignment, so conversations begun recently are receiving an extra boost as your attention shifts toward important people. Communication is the name of the game, but you don’t need to play games in order to succeed.

Taurus

April 20 – May 20

Accomplishing everything in front of you should be easy as pie. There’s a simple theme to the day as the Moon marches through your efficient 6th house, showing you how to move forward one step at a time. You can absolutely make steady progress in your preferred direction. Your finances are still in the picture after the recent Sun-Mercury conjunction in your money sector, so you can potentially turn this productivity into cash in the bank if you take things slowly.

Gemini

May 21 – June 20

It’s a good day to enjoy yourself! There’s a cosmic emphasis on pleasure while the Moon dances through your fun-loving 5th house, so you’re probably not very focused on work or anything mundane at the moment. If needs must, you can buckle down and get things done with the Sun and Mercury both tightly aligned in your sign. Still, try to find some time to express yourself — maybe even in front of an audience! The universe wants you to show off your talents.

Cancer

June 21 – July 22

You can move at a manageable pace when you acknowledge everything will happen when it’s meant to. Make an effort to set aside the wider world to manage any internal issues while the Moon moves through your foundational 4th house. You shouldn’t have to worry about what others are up to! You’re also allowed to indulge in some magical self-case as the Sun and Mercury sway close together in your fantastical 12th house, try welcoming a bit of fantasy into your life.

Leo

July 23 – August 22

Everywhere you go, there’s someone you know! The Moon is frolicking through your neighborly 3rd house, making it a good time to get out and about and see what’s going on in your local community. People could be popping up like mushrooms thanks to the fact the Sun and Mercury are chatting together in your 11th House of Global Networks. Don’t be shocked if your popularity is off the charts. Everyone should be eager to spend time together, so get on board.

Virgo

August 23 – September 22

This is no time to rest on your laurels! Your mind is tugged toward your money while the Moon tours your 2nd House of Earned Income. Do your best to make time to check on your annual budget, just in case. You can think in broader terms with the Sun and Mercury continuing along in your career sector, so don’t focus on small details that won’t create an impact. A work opportunity may also be in the cards if you know where to look.

Libra

September 23 – October 22

You deserve as much attention as anyone else. It’s a good time to focus on your needs and goals while the Moon is spending time in your sign, inspiring you to ponder personal matters that were potentially put on hold while other concerns demanded your focus. Broad thinking is encouraged with other planets lighting up your expansion sector, so avoid limiting yourself in any way. The possibilities really are endless if you are willing to pursue them.

Scorpio

October 23 – November 21

There’s a special undercurrent to the day, one which encourages a gentle touch. You’ll be drawn to lay back while the Moon is coasting through your dreamy 12th house. There’s no need to put the pedal to the metal if you’d rather hang out in the slow lane. A strange, suspicious feeling could rear its head while your 8th House of Secrets hosts a number of other planets, but don’t get caught up in potential problems if your reality appears anything but stormy.

Sagittarius

November 22 – December 21

The way you connect to others is coming into sharper focus. You may find yourself interacting with lots of different people from many different places while the Moon tours your 11th House of Social Networks. However, the most important connections should be easily identified, thanks to the focus of the Sun and Mercury continuing to march through your 7th House of Partnerships. When it comes to your relationships, think in terms of quality, rather than quantity, and you can’t go wrong.

Capricorn

December 22 – January 19

You can make steady progress, knowing you’re heading in the right direction. You’re in your element as the Moon moves through your ambitious 10th house, bracing you to get serious about how you use your time and energy. Check in on any ongoing projects — or start a new one! With the Sun and Mercury traveling in tandem through your responsible 6th house, it should be unusually easy to roll up your sleeves and get to work. Choose your destination, then start walking.

Aquarius

January 20 – February 18

The world is full of possibility, so don’t just leave it for others to discover! You’ve got your sights set as far as possible while the Moon soars through your 9th House of Adventure, giving you a bird’s eye view of life. You should find plenty of things to enjoy beyond the horizon, thanks to the fact that the Sun and Mercury are still dancing in your 5th House of Pleasure, so spread your wings and see what’s on offer.

Pisces

February 19 – March 20

It’s a good day to focus on your feelings. The Moon is encouraging you to enjoy some alone time while it drifts through your private 8th house, so don’t be shocked if the last thing you want to do is bounce around, chit-chatting and having small talk with random strangers. The urge to stick close to home is especially strong while a number of other planets still hover in your foundational 4th house. Tend to your individual needs before bowing to others.

Nationals pile up seven runs in third inning in rout of Shaun Anderson, Marlins

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 18:16

By PATRICK STEVENS (Associated Press)

WASHINGTON — Lane Thomas homered to highlight a seven-run third inning, and the Washington Nationals routed the Miami Marlins 8-1 on Friday night in the opener of a three-game series.

MacKenzie Gore struck out 10 over seven innings for Washington, which has won six of seven and improved to 5-0 against Miami this season.

The Marlins, who are an NL-worst 23-46, have lost three in a row and nine of their last 11. Miami fell to 3-21 when facing a left-handed starter.

Gore (6-5) won for the fourth time in five starts, giving up a run on five hits while matching the longest outing of his career.

“Gore’s good,” Miami manager Skip Schumaker said. “I had him in San Diego as a young kid and seeing him mature into what he is today is great to see, when we’re not playing him. He was on the attack.”

The Nationals chased Miami starter Shaun Anderson (0-1), who was called up from Triple-A Jacksonville earlier in the day, with seven consecutive hits — many early in the count — to start the third. After Jacob Young’s leadoff single, CJ Abrams had a sharp infield single on the next pitch and Thomas followed with a first-pitch homer off the foul pole in left.

Jesse Winker turned Anderson’s first offering into an infield single, and Eddie Rosario sent an 0-2 fastball to right for a double. Joey Meneses poked a first-pitch single to left to score two runs, and Luis García Jr. ended Anderson’s night with a hit on a 1-0 fastball.

Four batters later, Abrams lofted a two-run single to left to make it 7-1. The seven runs — all charged to Anderson — matched the most scored by the Nationals in one inning this season. Washington also did it in the fourth inning of Sunday’s 8-5 victory over Atlanta.

Anderson, who was purchased from Texas on May 30 and was making his Marlins debut, gave up hits to 10 of the 15 batters he faced. It was his first major league start since Aug. 7, 2019.

“He just kind of got in the middle of the plate a little bit,” Schumaker said. “The stuff is OK. He just needs to play a little bit more on the edges, and the height of the pitches I think was just exactly where they probably wanted them and a little bit higher than probably he wanted them.”

Catcher Nick Fortes drove in Miami’s run with a two-out single to third baseman Nick Senzel in the second. In the dugout in the middle of the second, Gore and Senzel had a brief shoving match, and both players downplayed it after the game.

“We’ve handled it in here,” Gore said. “I think the biggest thing is that that was something I can’t do. But I’m going to leave it at that. That’s on me.”

TRAINER’S ROOM

Marlins: To make room for Anderson, Miami designated RHP Burch Smith for assignment. Smith was 2-0 with a 4.25 ERA in 25 games.

Nationals: RHP Josiah Gray (forearm flexor strain) allowed a run in four innings and struck out two in a rehabilitation start Friday night at Double-A Harrisburg. … Martinez said 1B Joey Gallo’s MRI exam revealed a “significant” hamstring strain. Gallo was placed on the injured list Wednesday. … RHP Cade Cavalli (Tommy John surgery) will throw batting practice Saturday. … LHP Jose A. Ferrer (lat strain) will throw batting practice Monday.

UP NEXT

Washington LHP DJ Herz (0-1, 6.48 ERA) makes his third career start, while Miami counters with LHP Trevor Rogers (1-7, 5.37) as the series continues Saturday afternoon.

___

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/mlb

Trump paints dark picture of America, promises rosy future if he defeats Biden

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 18:15

Celebrating his birthday, former President Donald Trump presented a dark vision of America that he said could only be transformed one way — with his return as president.

He said the country was hobbled by rising prices, endangered by criminals from other countries  and threatened by terrorists he claimed are roaming the nation.

“This is the most important election that our country has ever had because we’re a failing nation. And we can’t be a failing nation for long,” he said.

Trump’s declarations came Friday night during a combination rally and birthday celebration in West Palm Beach before an exuberant crowd.

Trump made a range of claims about what he said is the nation’s decline, the evils of President Joe Biden, plus some promise for the future and boasts about what life was like when he was president.

Former President Donald Trump greets people as he exits the stage after speaking to members of the Club 47 group at the Palm Beach Convention Center on June 14, 2024, in West Palm Beach. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Border security was a constant theme from the beginning to the end.

Trump asserted that Biden has intentionally opened the southern U.S. border to hordes of illegal immigrants. He said Biden is either unaware of or doesn’t care about what is going on at the border.

He started by claiming crime is down in Venezuela because they’re emptying prisons and sending prisoners to the U.S. Then he broadened the claim to include the assertion that other countries are emptying their prisons — and lowering their crime rates by sending their convicts to the U.S.

He also said the country is teeming with terrorists that have crossed the border. He didn’t offer evidence for the supposed shipping of prisoners and hordes of terrorists.

“Terrorist savages are entering through Joe Biden’s open border,” he said. “Crooked Joe Biden released these terrorists and all of these people into the United States totally unchecked, totally unvetted.”

“It’s crazy,” Trump declared, claiming that “he set them loose” to put their terror network in place across the United States.

But, Trump said, it would end if he’s elected president in November. “By this time next year, America’s borders will be shut, sealed and secured.” He said he’d president over the biggest deportation in history and send “Biden’s illegal aliens away.”

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Trump raised another security threat. “Now we have Russian warships and submarines off the coast of Cuba,” he said. “Biden’s weakness is putting us in grave danger.”

HIs other central theme was his insistence that Biden is mentally and physically feeble. “We have a president who has no clue as to what the hell is going on,” he said. “He doesn’t know where the hell he is.”

He returned to the theme often but didn’t offer specific evidence of his supposed declining abilities, which he said are obvious to anyone who looks.

“He’s just a horrible president, a horrible, horrible president,” he said. “You could take the 10 worst presidents and add them up and he’s worse.”

Some of the loudest applause came when he briefly raised issues that have become passionate concerns for his MAGA supporters: promising not to “give a penny to any school that has a vaccine mandate,” opposition to efforts that advance diversity, equity and inclusion, and preventing transgender women from competing in sports.

He promised an economic boom if he’s president again.

“We’ll throw out Bidenomics and replace it very quickly with MAGA-nomics,” he said. “America will prosper like never before. We will bring our country back. We will bring our country back quickly.”

Trump made several Florida references, including praising U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., for doing a great job. Rubio, who delivered a warm-up speech, is one of several candidates vying for the vice presidential slot on Trump’s ticket.

Trump, who always watches public opinion polls, noted his strong standing in Florida, which is no longer considered a swing state in presidential contests. “We’re winning big in Florida.”

The event, sponsored by Club 47, the big pro-Trump club in Palm Beach County, was a combination of rally and celebration for his 78th birthday. He said it was the biggest birthday party he’s ever had.

Trump gave a relatively brief speech by his usual standard, lasting only 57 minutes. Usually he speaks much longer. His delivery was also much more rushed than it often is.

“I hate to conclude,” he said as he wrapped up an unusually short speech, which lasted less than an hour. “We should go on much longer.”

Anthony Man can be reached at aman@sunsentinel.com and can be found @browardpolitics on Bluesky, Threads, Facebook and Mastodon.

1 dead, 4 hospitalized in apparent drive-by shooting in Fort Lauderdale, police say

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 17:48

One person died and four others were hospitalized after an apparent drive-by shooting in Fort Lauderdale on Friday night, police said.

Officers and Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue responded to the 2300 block of Northwest Eighth Street shortly after 7 p.m. and found five men who had been shot, Det. Ali Adamson, a spokesperson for the police department, said in an email.

Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue took all five men to Broward Health Medical Center. Adamson said late Friday that one man was pronounced dead at the hospital and one man is in critical condition. The three others injured are expected to survive, she said.

Adamson said the shooter or shooters fled before officers arrived in the area west of Interstate 95 between Sunrise and Sistrunk boulevards. She did not provide information about any car involved in the shooting.

This is a developing story, so check back for updates. Click here to have breaking news alerts sent directly to your inbox.

Judge dismisses lawsuit challenging federal rules to accommodate abortions for workers

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 16:19

By CLAIRE SAVAGE and ALEXANDRA OLSON (Associated Press)

CHICAGO (AP) — A lawsuit filed by 17 states challenging federal rules entitling workers to time off and other accommodations for abortions lacks standing, a federal judge in Arkansas ruled on Friday.

Republican attorneys general from each state, led by Arkansas and Tennessee, sued the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in April, days after the agency published rules for employers and workers to implement the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, a 2022 law requiring many employers to make “reasonable accommodations” for pregnant or postpartum employees.

In addition to more routine pregnancy workplace accommodations like time off for prenatal appointments, more bathroom breaks, or permission to carry snacks, the rules say that workers can ask for time off to obtain an abortion and recover from the procedure.

The lawsuit filed in federal court in Arkansas argued the regulations go beyond the scope of the 2022 law that passed with bipartisan support.

Eastern District of Arkansas U.S. District Judge D.P. Marshall, Jr., who was appointed to the bench by former President Barack Obama, denied the states’ request for a nationwide preliminary injunction on the federal rules, which are scheduled to go into effect on Tuesday.

“The States’ fear of overreach by one branch of the federal government cannot be cured with overreach by another,” Friday’s ruling says.

Arkansas Attorney General Tim Griffin said in a statement provided by a spokesperson that he is “disappointed in the court’s ruling” and “am considering all legal options and remain confident we will ultimately be successful.”

The other states that joined the lawsuit are Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah and West Virginia.

The EEOC regulations are also being challenged in another federal lawsuit in Louisiana that is still awaiting a ruling. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, along with other religious groups, have filed a separate lawsuit over the abortion provision in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana. That case has been consolidated with a lawsuit filed by the attorneys general of Louisiana and Mississippi, which also asks the judge to postpone the enforcement of the EEOC rules pending the outcome of the case.

The American Civil Liberties Union and more than 20 labor and women’s advocacy groups, including A Better Balance, a non-profit that spearheaded the 10-year campaign for the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act’s passage, filed amicus briefs in both cases arguing the EEOC rules should take effect as scheduled, calling them key to the successful implementation of law.

“Today’s ruling in Tennessee v. EEOC is a victory for millions of pregnant and postpartum workers across the country, because it allows the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) regulations to go into effect next week, providing important clarity about how the law works in practice,” said Dina Bakst of A Better Balance.

In their briefs, the groups cited dozens of examples of pregnant workers who have reached out to advocacy groups or filed lawsuits claiming that employers have continued to deny them accommodations in violation of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act.

“The relief sought in this case is completely overboard and would have harmed literally millions of people,” said Gillian Thomas, a senior staff attorney in the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project, referring to the lawsuit in Arkansas. “The law has been in place for a year and employers are violating it in the most egregious way right and left and clearly need guidance.”

The EEOC in its regulations said it was conforming to decades of legal precedent establishing that pregnancy anti-discrimination laws include abortion.

Abortion rights defenders have also hailed the protection under the EEOC rules as especially critical in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling that overturned the constitutional right to abortion. Women in states with strict abortion restrictions increasingly have to travel far to obtain the procedure, needing time off to do so.

____

The Associated Press’ women in the workforce and state government coverage receives financial support from Pivotal Ventures. AP is solely responsible for all content. Find AP’s standards for working with philanthropies, a list of supporters and funded coverage areas at AP.org.

Trump supporters gathering in West Palm Beach have a birthday wish — another term as president

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 15:34

The thousands of Donald Trump supporters who gathered Friday in West Palm Beach for a combination campaign rally and birthday celebration all seemed to support his wish  — to win another term as president.

“I love him,” said Judith Seide, 67, of Wellington, who attended with her husband, Fritz Seide. “He did good for the country. I would like him to get in power in ’24.”

Larry Snowden, president of the Club 47, the pro-Trump organization that sponsored the event, said the turnout showed that people “want to be close to President Trump.”

“It says a lot of things to me. It proves to me the court cases have done nothing but generate more support and enthusiasm for President Trump,” he said.

Just before 7 p.m. Trump came on stage and was serenaded with “Happy Birthday.”

“There’s nowhere else I’d rather be on my birthday … than with thousands of American patriots from the great state of Florida,” he said.

He offered prayers for people affected by the recent flooding in South Florida. “That was rain like few people have seen. Floridians are tough, and we will pull through,” Trump said. “Tough times.”

He quickly pivoted to bragging about what he said were his accomplishments and criticizing President Joe Biden.

“The worst, most incompetent, most corrupt president in history is dragging us toward World War III,” Trump said. “The American people were far better off when you had a president named Donald J. Trump.”

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who is one of the candidates hoping Trump picks him as his vice presidential running mate, offered extensive praise for the former president and bashed Biden in one of the warmup speeches.

“Americans know that under Donald Trump, America was prosperous, and under Joe Biden, our economy is a disaster. A disaster,” he said. “When Donald Trump was president, America was safer. Safer. When Donald Trump was president our border was secured and not out of control. … Now we have Joe Biden. And under Joe Biden, the world is completely out of control. Out of control.”

Rubio claimed that Democrats “have a mentally incompetent man as their candidate and our president.”

After Rubio left the stage, a large layer cake was brought on stage — topped with a MAGA hat.

Rubio’s speech followed a high-wattage group of other warmup speakers — including five members of Congress — serving red-hot rhetoric to fire up the crowd.

“We had the greatest president in the entire history of the United States,” said U.S. Rep. Ronnie Jackson, R-Texas. “Now we have the absolute worst president to ever set foot in the Oval Office.”

A birthday cake is carried onto the stage before Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at his birthday celebration, hosted by Club 47, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, June 14, 2024. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

When Jackson served as White House physician, he famously gave Trump a glowing bill of health. He later was demoted after the inspector general substantiated allegations of inappropriate behavior in that job.

“I’ve been there, I’ve seen what it takes mentally and physically to do the job of president. And I can tell you right now, Biden is not there. He is not mentally fit to be our commander in chief, to be our president,” Jackson said.

Many people started lining up at the Palm Beach County Convention Center long before the doors opened, which was hours before the speeches began.

All said it was worth the wait. None said they had any qualms about supporting Trump’s bid for a return to the White House, even after he was convicted of 34 felony convictions in New York and has other criminal charges pending.

Jill Whitlock (left) and Will Whitlock (center) of St. Augustine and Shelli Gail (right) of West Palm Beach were among thousands of supporters of former President Donald Trump who gathered for a rally at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach on Friday, June, 14, 2024. (Anthony Man/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

“The conviction and the charges against him is the liberal attempt to keep him out of office,” said Charlotte Gomes, of Loxahatchee.

Julie Kantor, of Port St. Lucie, said her support hasn’t been swayed, calling the charges “bogus.”

Allison Sneed, 60, wearing glittery TRUMP pins over a sequined American flag top, was defiant. “They can throw a million convictions at him. I’ll still vote for him,” she said. “We are going to vote for our felon; we don’t care.”

Dig deep enough, Gomes said, and something untoward can be found in anyone’s past. “Although Trump might not be what the world considers a perfect man, he was a fantastic president. He proved it the first time.”

Gomes, 58, was excited to help mark Trump’s 78th birthday. She was wearing a glittering orange party hat — given to her by someone else in the line on the way in — emblazoned with “47 MAGA.” MAGA is the acronym for Make America Great Again, Trump’s 2016 campaign slogan; if he’s elected again, he’d be the 47th president.

Supporters arrive before Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at his birthday celebration, hosted by Club 47, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, June 14, 2024. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Gomes said President Joe Biden must be defeated.

“Biden needs to be put out. He’s totally ineffective,” she said, adding that she sees the world as more dangerous under Biden than it was during Trump’s previous term.

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“The economy is being destroyed by Biden’s policies,” she said.

A vendor sells merchandise before Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at his birthday celebration, hosted by Club 47, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, June 14, 2024. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Official figures show that inflation is moderating and unemployment is at the lowest levels in more than 50 years. Gomes, however, doesn’t believe the statistics.

Neither does Fritz Seide, who is an accountant and real estate broker.

Even though the economy tanked during Trump’s last year in office as the COVID-19 pandemic wreaked havoc, Seide said he was a better economic steward than Biden.

“He improved the economy. He made America great again. And now everything is down,” Seide said.

Kantor, 68, wearing an American flag-themed cowboy hat and vest, and her husband, Cary Kantor, arrived from Port St. Lucie at about 10:30 a.m., more than four hours before the doors opened and more than eight hours before Trump was scheduled to take the stage.

They’ve supported Trump since 2016, but Friday was the first time they’d come to see him at a live event.

If he’s elected again, Julie Kantor said she believes Trump will “fix the economy” and clean up corruption. “Things were better under Trump.”

People were in a celebratory mood. Sneed, from Sarasota, estimated she has been to more than 20 Trump rallies. “This is better than a concert,” she said.

“It’s so nice to be around such like-minded people,” remarked a person in one of lines at a women’s restroom. Another woman, also wearing a MAGA party hat, further back in the line, echoed the sentiment. “Better than being with my family. Some of them are so liberal!”

Anthony Man can be reached at aman@sunsentinel.com and can be found @browardpolitics on Bluesky, Threads, Facebook and Mastodon.

Las Vegas shooting survivors alarmed at US Supreme Court’s strike down of ban on rifle bump stocks

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 15:06

By JESSE BEDAYN and SCOTT SONNER (Associated Press/Report for America)

Survivors of the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas and families who received somber calls hours later said they were alarmed when the U.S. Supreme Court Friday struck down a ban on the gun attachment used by the gunman who rattled off over 1,000 bullets in 11 minutes.

The Trump-era ban on bump stocks, a rapid-fire accessory that allows a rate of fire comparable to that of machine guns, was nixed in a 6-3 majority opinion. Justice Clarence Thomas, who authored the opinion, wrote that the Justice Department was wrong in declaring that bump stocks transformed semiautomatic rifles into illegal machines guns because they don’t “alter the basic mechanics of firing.”

The ruling was not directly about the Second Amendment, and Justice Samuel Alito concurred with Thomas but wrote a short separate opinion to stress that Congress can change the law.

“I’m pro-gun, but I don’t believe anyone should have an automatic weapon in a civilized world. It’s a bomb waiting to go off,” said Craig Link, whose brother, Victor Link, was struck in the head as the first barrage of shots rang out. Victor Link, 55, died soon after.

Link said the two were like twins, though “I never met anybody that didn’t like Victor. I met some people that didn’t like me,” he said, laughing, then welling up. Link was supposed to be at the concert with his brother, a fact that has whirled in his head ever since.

“I can’t help but think over and over again, he and I might’ve been going to get a beer when that happened, or it might’ve been me instead of him,” he said.

The gunman fired into an outdoor country music festival on the Las Vegas Strip, killing 58 people and wounding more than 850 among the crowd of 22,000.

Shawna Bartlett, 49, was in the front row when rounds began hailing down and her friend was struck in the back. Amid ricocheting bullets and the screams, Bartlett helped load her friend into an ambulance, and she survived.

“I’m not telling you that you can’t get a gun,” said Bartlett, but “why does anyone need a bump stock? Why does it need to be legal? People don’t use them for hunting, or in law enforcement.”

“These guns that are able to shoot way more because these bump stocks give you the power to do that. Nobody needs this stuff. It is absolutely ridiculous,” she said.

She said she struggled for years to deal with the trauma of the shooting, but things have felt much better in recent years.

“I’ve come really far in my healing process,” she said. “I can talk about it now without crying.”

Danette Meyers, who become a spokesperson for her good friends, the family of Christiana Duarte, who was slain at the concert, said she worries that even if Congress does act, it will take time.

“It’s certainly going to give someone out there the opportunity to buy one of these things and just create another mass slaughter,” Meyers said.

Meyers said she thought the Supreme Court’s “liberal dissent got it correct, when they said, `You know, it’s common sense that anything capable of initiating rapid fire would be a machine gun.’ ”

“He shot over a thousand times in about 11 minutes,″ she said.

Alvin Black, a tourist who was walking Friday on the Las Vegas Strip near the shooting site, said he likes handguns and has a shotgun at his home in North Carolina.

But “enabling people to make assault rifles more lethal and adding … a quasi-automatic function to it, it’s a terrible idea,” he said. “I don’t see in what situations that would be useful to the everyday gun owner.”

___

Bedayn reported from Denver. Sonner reported from Reno, Nevada. Associated Press writers Jim Salter in St. Louis, Ty O’Neil in Las Vegas and Gabe Stern in Reno contributed to this report.

___

Bedayn is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

Closing Parkland’s open wound: The dismantling of a crime scene

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 15:06

Editor’s note: Senior reporter Rafael Olmeda covers criminal justice and anchored the Sun Sentinel’s coverage of the sentencing trial of the Parkland shooter. Olmeda was one of the few journalists allowed into MSD’s 1200 building with the jurors,  and he was also present Friday in Parkland when the demolition of the crime scene got underway.

No one who went to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day 2018 left unharmed. Physically unwounded, sure. But not unharmed.

For their sake, a piece at a time, it’s finally coming down.

The stairs that the gunman used to walk from the second to the third are gone, torn out in one chunk like a gangrenous limb, dropped to the ground with a muffled crash early Friday afternoon.

Earlier, the same demolition equipment chewed its way into the classroom Scott Biegel died to protect. It’s reduced to rubble now, as the whole building soon will be. As it should be.

And it’s about time.

Not that it could or should have happened any sooner. But heaven forbid it should happen any later. We must never forget what happened here, and we will not. When Nikolas Cruz smugly decided to court notoriety by shooting his way through the freshman building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, he made victims of hundreds of people — not just the 17 he murdered and the 17 who managed to survive their gunshot wounds.

He made victims of those he missed, of those who had to step slowly over the bodies of their slain classmates lest they slip on their blood, of those who raced from the campus on Feb. 14, 2018, and of those who raced to the school to find their children.

The building had to stand so that jurors deciding the gunman’s fate could see what he left behind. The jury did that on Aug. 4, 2022. They had to. As powerful as words are, they cannot convey what those walls hid from the public. To step inside that building was to be confronted with the reason states like Florida still insist the death penalty is a necessary punishment for the worst of the worst crimes.

If this was not the worst of the worst, what could be?

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The northeast stairwell and a portion of Scott Beigel’s third floor classroom are exposed in this Friday, June 14, 2024, photo. Beigel, was killed in the 2018 shootings. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • What appears to be student work can be seen on the wall of teacher Scott Beigel’s third floor classroom can be seen as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Beigel, was killed in the 2018 shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Feb. 14, 2018, massacre where 17 people were killed and 17 others injured. The northeast stairwell and a portion of Scott Beigel’s third floor classroom are exposed in this image. Beigel was one of the adults who were killed. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • The word “GEOGRAPHY” can be seen on the board in what was teacher Scott Beigel’s third floor classroom as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Beigel, was killed in the 2018 shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Max Schachter speaks to the media as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Schachter’s son, Alex, was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • A woman clears debris from a memorial garden as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Tony Montalto walks with his wife, Jennifer, and son, Anthony, on campus just before the start of demolition of the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Montalto’s daughter, Gina, was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Onlookers take photos as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Tony Montalto speaks to the media as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Montalto’s daughter, Gina, was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Workers prepare for demolition of the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Lori Alhadeff speaks with former MSD special education teacher Joanne Wallace through a fence as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Alhadeff’s daughter, Alyssa, was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Lori Alhadeff holds a picture of her daughter, Alyssa, as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. Alyssa was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Workers pass the east entrance of the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the door the gunman used to enter the building and perpetuate the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Former MSD special education teacher Joanne Wallace watch as demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Debbie Hixon and her son, Corey, arrive before the start of the demolition begins on the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The old freshman building at MSD has not been used since the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. Hixon’s husband and Corey’s father, Christopher, was killed in the 2018 shootings. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

  • Lori Alhadeff walks with her husband, Ilan, past heavy equipment just before the start of demolition of the 1200 Building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, the site of the Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre that took 17 lives and left 17 more wounded. The Alhadeff’s daughter, Alyssa, was killed in the shootings. Photographed on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel)

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The jury ultimately extended to Cruz a mercy of which he seemed incapable that Valentine’s Day. He was sentenced to 34 consecutive terms of life in prison. His precise location in the Florida Department of Corrections remains a closely guarded secret.

With the jury’s work done, calls for the building’s demolition began. There was talk of allowing a second jury inside to decide the fate of former School Resource Officer Scot Peterson, the armed deputy whose decision not to enter building compelled prosecutors to charge him with multiple counts of felony child neglect.

This time, jurors were not allowed inside. Peterson was found not guilty in 2023.

The calls to demolish the building began to intensify. But first the litigants in a civil trial wanted to send an expert into the building to re-enact the shooting to demonstrate what sounds could or could not be heard outside the building.

Then the family members of the victims were permitted to walk through. Then legislators and other public officials tasked with crafting public policy on gun rights and control. It seemed for a time that every visit, every tour would be the last.

And the building stood a little longer because it was the middle of the school year and no one could fathom embarking on this project with students on campus every day.

All along, Parkland residents have had to endure the site’s presence as a constant reminder of how close their loved ones came to death.

The building had to stand as long as it has. The demolition could not have happened sooner. But heaven forbid it should happen any later. No, now it can’t come down fast enough.

Rafael Olmeda can be reached at rolmeda@sunsentinel.com or 954-356-4457.

Florida condo owners get more rights in bill signed Friday by Gov. Ron DeSantis

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 14:41

Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday signed a bill intended to give more rights to condo owners, in the latest attempt to reform laws governing Florida’s often troubled community associations.

The new law, dubbed “Condo 3.0,” imposes education requirements on board members, requires more condo communities to set up web pages for members, makes it harder for boards to stifle dissent, and gives the state more power to investigate abuses.

Florida condo owners have been frequently frustrated in attempts to get the state to investigate complaints of corruption, unfair governance and other abuses because the law previously prevented the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation from looking into their complaints.

“This is a game-changer,” said Rep. Vicki Lopez, a Miami Republican who sponsored the bill, HB 1021. “They will really be able to help everybody, whether they’re property managers, condo owners or condo board members, they’ll be able to offer the assistance that’s so needed, because so often people made complaints and got back a responses that said ‘not within our jurisdiction,’ and now they’ll have plenty of jurisdiction and plenty of money.”

Condo Wars: Boards can use defamation laws to stifle dissent | Investigation

Here are highlights of the new law:

  • New board members must undergo four hours of education on how to run a condo association, a measure that would make them less vulnerable to manipulation by outside vendors, attorneys or their own residents.
  • Condos with 25 units or more must set up web pages that include documents such as bylaws, budgets and lists of contracts with vendors. The requirement previously applied only to condos with at least 150 units. The law requires boards to meet four times a year, up from the current two.
  • Boards are barred from retaliating against dissenters through the filing of defamation lawsuits. The use of defamation suits to silence dissent was highlighted in a South Florida Sun Sentinel series last year on condo and HOA abuses.
  • The Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation will get more authority to investigate wrongdoing by condo boards and will receive funding to hire additional staff.

About half of Floridians live under the authority of community associations, as owners or tenants in condo buildings and in neighborhoods governed by homeowners’ associations.

Condo Wars: State regulators a dead end for desperate condo owners

The legislation, sponsored in the Senate by Sen. Jennifer Bradley, one of a series of reforms attempted in the past few years, comes at a difficult time for Florida’s community associations. Insurance costs are soaring, leading to crushing increases in monthly fees on homeowners.

High-rise condos are absorbing the costs of higher maintenance requirements imposed after the 2021 collapse of the Champlain Towers condo building in Surfside. There have been a series of highly publicized cases of abuses by boards, including the arrests of board members of the Hammocks community in Miami-Dade County for what prosecutors say was a vast embezzlement scheme.

The legislation follows another law recently signed by the governor aimed at preventing abuses by homeowners’ associations, which differ from condo associations in that they govern communities of single-family homes. That bill, HB 1203, bars HOAs from imposing excessive fines, which can lead to late fees, liens, litigations and ultimately the loss of a home.

That law bans fines for leaving trash cans out too long or leaving holiday decoration up past the association’s time limit, among many other restrictions on the right of associations to impose fines on residents.

Democrats, many from South Florida, win 11 legislative seats. They include Bernard, Daley, Hunschofsky, Skidmore.

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 14:22

TALLAHASSEE — Eleven candidates, mostly incumbents and many from South Florida, won legislative races Friday as they did not draw opponents before a qualifying deadline, while the Florida Democratic Party hit a goal of having candidates vie for every seat up for election.

Two Democrats — former House members Carlos Guillermo Smith, of Orlando, and Mack Bernard, of West Palm Beach — locked up Senate seats, while nine incumbent House members won additional two-year terms.

Florida Democratic Party Chairwoman Nikki Fried touted the party fielding a candidate in every race, after Republicans have controlled the House and Senate since the 1990s.

“It’s a record-breaking accomplishment for the Florida Democratic Party and a stark contrast to the party we inherited after 2022 — a party Republicans declared ‘dead’ just one year ago,” Fried said in a prepared statement. “Now, we have the momentum.”

Republican Party of Florida Chairman Evan Power called the Democrats’ effort a “stunt to get attention.”

“While Nikki Fried and the Democrats are focused on a participation trophy, the Florida GOP is dedicated to winning,” Power said in a text.

In the House, the unopposed Democratic incumbents were:

— Yvonne Hinson, of Gainesville.
— Jervonte Edmonds, of West Palm Beach.
— Kelly Skidmore, of Boca Raton.
— Christine Hunschofsky, of Parkland.
— Dan Daley, of Coral Springs.
— Lisa Dunkley, of Sunrise.
— Hillary Cassel, of Dania Beach.
— Felicia Robinson, of Miami Gardens.
— Dotie Joseph, of North Miami.

Smith, who won the Senate District 17 seat held by term-limited Sen. Linda Stewart, D-Orlando, served in the House from 2016 to 2022. He lost a reelection bid in 2022 after his district was redrawn.

Bernard, who served in the House from 2009 to 2012 and subsequently served on the Palm Beach County Commission, was the only candidate to qualify in what is technically a special election to replace Sen. Bobby Powell, D-West Palm Beach, in Senate District 24. Powell gave up the final two years of his Senate term to run for the Palm Beach County Commission.

Though Democrats fielded candidates throughout the state, numerous races aren’t expected to be competitive, in part because many Republicans are incumbents and the GOP has built a large voter-registration edge.

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But the strategy for Democratic Party is to raise awareness for Democrats statewide during a presidential election year and to force Republicans to spread dollars to races.

“We are not going to just let Republicans walk into office without being held accountable,” Danielle Hawk, Florida Democratic Party candidates and campaigns director, said in a statement.

Sen. Blaise Ingoglia, a Spring Hill Republican and former chairman of the state GOP, described the Democratic effort as “wasting money in safe Republican seats.”

“This isn’t a win,” Ingoglia posted online. “It’s foolishness for a cash-strapped party.”

The parties, however, will square off in places such as Senate District 3 in North Florida.

Sen. Corey Simon, a former Florida State University and National Football League standout, will face the winner of a Democratic primary between Daryl Parks and Kimblin Nesmith.

Parks, a prominent civil-rights attorney, has quickly piled up money for the race in the sprawling district, which includes Tallahassee.

As another example of a competitive district, Republicans want to unseat Rep. Lindsay Cross, D-St. Petersburg, in Pinellas County’s House District 60. She faces a challenge from Republican Ed Montanari, a St. Petersburg City Council member.

Meanwhile, attention has been raised over a potential “ghost” candidate in House District 106 in Miami-Dade County.

Former Democratic Rep. Joe Saunders is trying to unseat Rep. Fabian Basabe, R-Miami Beach. But St. Johns County resident Maureen Saunders Scott qualified to run for the seat without party affiliation under the name Moe Saunders.

After the 2020 elections, Republican political operatives faced allegations that they used third-party “ghost” candidates in South Central and Central Florida to “confuse voters and siphon votes” by having similar names on the ballot or by running nearly identical ads to Democrats.

Other hard-fought races will come in party primaries in places such as Northeast Florida’s Senate District 7, which is open because Sen. Travis Hutson, R-St. Augustine, faces term limits.

House Appropriations Chairman Tom Leek, R-Ormond Beach, has drawn support in the Senate race from big-name Republicans including Gov. Ron DeSantis.

But he faces two primary opponents, including former longtime St. Johns County Sheriff David Shoar. The district is made up of St. Johns, Putnam, Flagler and part of Volusia counties.

Meanwhile, former Democratic Congressman Alan Grayson has qualified to run in Central Florida’s Senate District 25, which is open because Sen. Victor Torres, D-Orlando, faces term limits.

The Democratic primary also includes Carmen Torres, who is married to Victor Torres, and Rep. Kristen Arrington, D-Kissimmee. The district includes Osceola County and part of Orange County.

Also in Central Florida, Randolph Bracy, a former Democratic lawmaker, has qualified to run against Sen. Geraldine Thompson, D-Windermere, in Orange County’s Senate District 15.

In the House, term-limited Sen. Debbie Mayfield, R-Indialantic, will battle in the Republican primary in Brevard County’s House District 32 against former Congressman Dave Weldon.

In Miami-Dade County’s House District 109, former Democratic Rep. James Bush has returned for a primary re-match against Rep. Ashley Gantt, D-Miami. Gantt defeated Bush by 3.4 percentage points in the 2022 Democratic primary. The race also includes former Democratic Rep. Roy Hardemon.

Broward 2A-1A boys track and field first team, second team, honorable mention and coach of the year

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:58
FIRST TEAM Jonathan Anthony, Track, Calvary Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jonathan Anthony, 400/800, Calvary Christian sophomore: School-record holder as a member of the 4×400 relay team which finished fourth in the Class 1A state meet; set a PR in the 800 (1:56.8); said 4×800 relay was 0.02 seconds away from school record; also ran cross country.

James Bernatek, Track, South Florida Heat. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

James Bernatek, Pole vault, South Florida HEAT junior: School-record holder in pole vault and finished fourth in the 1A meet (14 feet, 3 inches); broke pole vault record by a foot at the Pine Crest relay; favoring USF, or any schools looking to give scholarships for pole vault.

Stone Bureau, Track, Calvary Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Stone Bureau, Triple jump, Calvary Christian senior: The North Georgia signee (basketball) placed second in the 2A state championships with a PR in the triple jump (45-8 ½); sixth in the long jump (22-3 ½), and eighth in the high jump (5-11 ½); took first in districts and regionals and became the first person from his school to win three state medals.

Julian Granville, Track, University School. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Julian Granville, 400, University School senior: Despite being the last seed entering the 2A competition, ran a personal-best 49.06 to place 10th; also a member of the sixth-place 4×400 relay team; top high jump was 5-11 ½; captain of the school’s basketball team; committed to NSU.

Eric Kontos, Track, North Broward Prep. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Eric Kontos, Javelin, North Broward Prep junior: The captain of the football team finished 15th in the 2A state meet in the javelin throw; his career-best throw is 158-10; won districts and finished fourth at the regionals; holds third best throw in school history; also made winning catch in homecoming football game.

Liam Marley, Track, Calvary Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Liam Marley, Shot put/Discus, Calvary Christian sophomore: School-record holder in the discus (168-9) and finished fourth in the state in both the discus and shot put; had PR at state in the shot put (52-1); competed in track for three years and also plays football.

Jonathan Pena, Track, Westminster Academy. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jonathan Pena, 1,600/3,200, Westminster Academy junior: Named the school’s athlete of the year; finished second in 1,600 with a school record (4:18.79) at 1A state meet; and was seventh in 4×800 (8:08.59) another school record; career highlight was second at state and third for cross country.

Ryan Sims, Track, Calvary Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Ryan Sims, Triple jump, Calvary Christian junior: Proud of eclipsing 43 feet in the triple jump (43-9 ¾) and qualifying for the state where he placed ninth; was the city of Fort Lauderdale triple jump champion the past two years; plans to enlist in the Florida National Guard upon graduation.

Darius Smith, Trackj, Chaminade-Madonna. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Darius Smith, 100/200, Chaminade-Madonna junior: Team captain and member of the school-record 4×100 relay (41.42); set PRs and placed third at Class 2A state meet in 100 (10.64) and 200 (21.56) and won the 4X100; also plays football.

Tyson Waters, Track, Chaminade-Madonna. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Tyson Waters, 110 hurdles/400 hurdles, Chaminade-Madonna senior: Team captain set PRs in finishing third in both of his events at state – 110 hurdles (15.00) and 400 hurdles (55.65) and was 10th as a member of the 4×400 relay; committed to run track at United States Air Force Academy; also played football.

DJ Wimbley, Track, Westminster Academy. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

DJ Wimbley, High jump, Westminster Academy junior: Three-sport star and team captain holds nearly 30 offers between football and basketball; finished fourth in the Class 1A state in the high jump (6-1 ½) for a second time; also threw 38-0 in in the shot put, a PR; all-county selection six times between football, track, and basketball.

2024 Broward Spring All County First Team: Derek Cooper, Chaminade-Madonna; 2024 Broward Spring All County First Team Class 2A-1A boys track. (Chaminade-Madonna Athletics/Courtesy)

Derrek Cooper, Long jump, Chaminade-Madonna sophomore: Competed in four events at the 1A state championships; was a member of the winning 4×100 team (41.42); 11th in the long jump, 12th in the 200, and 15th in the 100; had best performances of 10.88 (100), 22.21 (200), 22-7 ¾ (long jump) and 38-11 ½ (triple jump); also plays football.

2024 Broward Spring All County First Team: Daniel Hubner, Calvary Christian Academy; 2024 Broward Spring All County First Team boys Class 2A-1A track. (Daniel Hubner/Courtesy)

Daniel Hubner, 100, Calvary Christian senior: Ran in three events at Class 2A state meet – 100 (13th), 200 (16th) and 4×100 relay (7th); set PRs in winning the 100 (10.78), and finishing third in the 200 (22.26); also, was on the winning 4×100 relay; captured district titles in all three events.

Relays

4×100: Chaminade-Madonna (Darius Smith, Troy Waters, Jacob Thomas, Derrek Cooper), 41.42

4×400: University School (Josiah Sinclair-Bergin, Julian Granville, Landon Kelly, Carlos Avila-Lopez), 3:21.96

4×800: Calvary Christian (Dylan Crowers, Mason Morin, Matteo Maldonado, Jonathan Anthony), 7:59.84

SECOND TEAM

Luke Cichoski, 110 hurdles, Cardinal Gibbons sophomore

Dylan Crowers, 800, Calvary Christian senior

Antonio Feacher, Long jump, Cardinal Gibbons senior

David Harvin, 400 hurdles, Westminster Academy senior

Yohan-Li Louis, 100/200, Calvary Christian junior

Sean Nagle, Javelin, Pine Crest junior

Tanner Pritchard, 1600/3200, Westminster Academy junior

Gareth Redway, Pole vault, South Florida HEAT junior

Ryan Sims, Triple jump, Calvary Christian junior

Josiah Sinclair-Bergen, 400, University School sophomore

Jayden Smith, High jump, North Broward Prep sophomore

Jacob Thomas, 100/200, Chaminade-Madonna freshman

Brandon Tobias, Shot put/discus, Cardinal Gibbons senior

Relays

4×100: Cardinal Gibbons (Jeremiah Chalmers, Tyler Jackson, Jamarcus Pierre, Brian Williams), 42.19

4×400: Calvary Christian (Jonathan Anthony, Tyson Danheiser, Yohan-Li Louis. Micah Williams), 3:24.04

4×800: Westminster Academy (Jonah Nowicki, Jonathan Pena, Tanner Pritchard, Tyler Pritchard), 8:03.86

HONORABLE MENTION

Abundant Life Christian: Emery Jackson, Christopher Roker

Calvary Christian: Sawyer Fuchs, Troy Ganter, Matthias Gooden, Stephen Hamilton, Micaiah McIntyre, Mason Morin, Lucas Yalale

Cardinal Gibbons: Tyler Jackson, Jamarcus Pierre, Dominic Tironi

Chaminade-Madonna: Jabari Brady, Jeremiah Adras, Koby Howard, Troy Waters

Coral Springs Charter: Beylian DeJesus, Preston Griffin

Highlands Christian: Jadon Clarke, Benjamin Francis, Hopeny Louis

North Broward Prep: Christopher Baker, Matthew Fullerton, Caleb Makovsky,

Pine Crest: Lucien Brett, Will Davila, Ryan Frawley, Erick Villan

Somerset Prep (NL): McKeylan Albert

South Florida HEAT: Augusto Caceres, David Diez, Joseph Dorn, Morgan Hunter, Jackson Stanton

University School: Landon Kelly

Westminster Academy: Fisher Blake, Nicolas Kostelidis, Devin Pierce, Tyler Pritchard, Scott Sanok

CO-COACHES OF THE YEAR Scott Sherrod, Track, Calvary Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Scott Sherrod, Calvary Christian: Guided the Eagles to a fourth-place finish at state with 35.35 points. “I am very proud of the team and the great season we had. The boys and girls team both went above expectations because we haven’t competed this well throughout the season in years.”

Steven Payne, Track, Chaminade-Madonna. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Steven Payne, Chaminade-Madonna: Led the Lions boys team to the district title, regional runner-up, and a third-place finish at the state finals. “I’m most proud of the team coming together to attain the level of success that was achieved with the group being so young and inexperienced. Seeing their confidence, morale, and sportsmanship grow while competing was my favorite part.”

Palm Beach 4A-3A boys track athlete of the year: Will Owens, Jupiter senior

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:56

Last year, Will Owens traded in his baseball glove for track spikes, and he hasn’t looked back.

The Jupiter track and field athlete culminated his senior year with a third-place finish in the 100 and a fourth in the 200 at the Class 4A state championships at the University of North Florida Hodges Stadium in Jacksonville.

His times were just off the personal bests and school records he set in winning the regionals 10 days before — 100 (10.51) and 200 (21.22). He also ran a 50.19 in the 400 but didn’t run that race at state. He also was a member of the 4×100 relay team (42.65).

Owens, who is committed to UNF, didn’t make it past the regional meet last year.

“It started last year when I fell short of regionals and I worked really hard for eight months starting in September,” said Owens, a two-year captain and team MVP. “I really worked hard the whole year with my coaches (Nate Robinson and Larry Jones) and did everything I could from running in the hot sun to lifting weights. They gave me the best workouts possible.”

“I think coming up short last year was due to my lack of experience,” said Owens, who only started competing in track last year.

“It was also partly technique, so when I got back to regionals this year, I was ready, and it carried me through,” he explained. “I was motivated more than ever. I always wanted to run track, but baseball and track are during the same season. It was the best decision I ever made. I hope I built a foundation for the younger athletes on the team so they can make it to states.”

Owens showed huge progress, according to Jupiter track coach Larry Jones. He improved by a full second in the 100 and more than a half second in the 200.

“Will had a pretty successful season last year as a first-year track athlete but came up just short,” Jones said. “Will went to the state meet last year as a spectator but vowed he’d be back this year as a competitor and boy did he. Will was the glue of the team not only with his physical prowess and leadership but also with his unspoken work ethic.”

Will Owens, All County Track and Field, from Jupiter, photographed on Tuesday, May 28, 2024 (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Palm Beach 4A-3A boys track and field first team, second team, honorable mention and coach of the year

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:55
FIRST TEAM Max Cescato, Track, Spanish River. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Max Cescato, 800, Spanish River junior: Most proud of winning county and districts in the 800; finished second in the regional with PR of 1:57.72; shaved five seconds off previous long-standing 4×800 relay time (7:55.49) to take fourth at state.

Ethen Cook, Track, Spanish River. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Ethen Cook, 110 hurdles/400 hurdles, Spanish River senior: Four-year varsity member holds school records in all three relays; ran a 14.5 in the 110 hurdles and 55.73 in the 400 hurdles; finished 13th at states in 110 hurdles; won county title in the 110 and was third In 400 hurdles; also has personal best of 50.59 in 400 dash; plays lacrosse and volleyball.

Mark Fyffe, Track, Wellington. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Mark Fyffe, Long jump, Wellington senior: Team captain finished third at the 4A state meet with a personal-best and school-record 23-7 ¼ in the long jump after entering state meet ranked 14th out of 18 and set a PR by more than a foot and a half.

Jonathan Gary, Track, Palm Beach Gardens. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jonathan Gary II, Shot put/Discus, Palm Beach Gardens sophomore: Had personal bests of 42-½ (shot) and 142-8 (discus), which helped him get third at regionals; was third at county meet in the discus; member of wrestling and football teams.

Rodney Green Jr. Track, Dwyer. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Rodney Green, 400/long jump, Dwyer senior: County long jump champ had personal-best effort (23-3 ¼) in the event; finished 12th in the 400 (49.25), a PR at state; won district and second in regional; has a PR of 22.13 (200).

Devonte Hanson, Track, Wellington. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Devonte Hanson, Triple jump, Wellington senior: Two-sport star was a two-time district champion in the triple jump (44-10 ½); placed third at county meet in the event; other top times included 53.86 (400), 59.79 (400H), 16.41 (110H); and 21-4 (long jump).

Maccabee Harad, Track, Spanish River. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Maccabee Harad, 3,200, Spanish River junior: Won county championship in the 3,200 and recorded best times in the 800 (2:03.49), 4:37.62 (1,600), and 9:48.37 (3,200), which came in the Pepsi Florida Relays where he finished 20th.

Thomas Horner, Track, Suncoast. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Thomas Horner, Javelin, Suncoast sophomore: Threw the javelin over 165 feet each time at state, including a personal-best and school-record throw of 173-6, which was good enough for sixth place; took second in district, fourth in regional.

Christopher Morinvil, Track, Boynton Beach. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Christopher Morinvil, 400, Boynton Beach senior: Talented Tiger is a three-time state qualifier who finished in 11th place in the 400 dash at state; had personal bests of 10.99 (100), 22.18 (200), 49.01 (400), 22 ¼ (long jump), 1:59.85 (800) and 43-6 (triple jump).

Preston Sangely, Track, Spanish River. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Preston Sangely, 1,600/3,200, Spanish River sophomore: Sun Sentinel 2023 Palm Beach boys cross country runner of the year had a best time of 15:49; ran 4:24.84 in 1,600 and 9:45.33 in 3,200, which is a personal best and school record; member of the school-record 4×800 relay team that placed fourth at state.

Jayson Smith, Track, Dwyer. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jayson Smith, High jump, Dwyer sophomore: Improved his high hump by 10 inches over his freshman year; finished fifth in the region; season-best 6-3 ½ in winning the district title; second at county meet in high jump; also did triple jump (41-3 ¼).

DeAndre Desinor, Atlantic; 2024 Palm Spring All County First Team Class 4A-3A boys track. (Atlantic Athletics/Courtesy)

Deandre Desinor, 100/200, Atlantic junior: Finished fourth in the county championships in the 100 and fifth in the 200; had best times of 10.97 (100) and 22.62 (200); the standout football player for the Eagles and had seven TDs and 485 all-purpose yards in one game.

Benjamin Malcolm, Dwyer, Track/field. In Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 31, 2023. Spring All County sports photos, (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Benjamin Malcolm, Pole vault, Dwyer senior: The Palm Beach State commit jumped a personal-best 13-9 ¼ in the pole vault at the Class 4A state meet; won district, second in regional, third in county; helped team finish second place at the regional meet.

Relays

4×100: Jupiter (Jayden Baker, Jayden Jackson, William Owens, Carter Simonson), 42.65

4×400: Royal Palm Beach (Jameire Holmes, Bennie Murvin, Ethan Thomas, Riley Valuntas), 3:21.97

4×800: Spanish River (Max Cescato, Daniel Reyes, Casey Sangely, Preston Sangely), 7:55.48

SECOND TEAM

Bernard Blanks, Shot put, Boynton Beach sophomore

William Connors, 1600/3200, Wellington junior

Justin Dewar, 400, Park Vista senior

Miche Estime, 110 hurdles, Palm Beach Gardens senior

Manny Fernandez, 200, Seminole Ridge senior

Mac Hunt, Pole vault, Spanish River sophomore

Nico Piatt, Javelin, Palm Beach Gardens senior

Tristan Pierre-Louis, Triple jump, Wellington sophomore

Dylan Reiman, Discus, Dwyer senior

Daniel Reyes, 800, Spanish River junior

Garrett Rimes, Long jump, Seminole Ridge junior

Kelvin Smith, 800, Wellington junior

Kenyon Wells, 400 hurdles, Atlantic senior

Relays

4×100: Seminole Ridge (Olivier Christian, Manny Fernandez, Kamar Gilling, I-Jah Marseille), 42.82

4×400: Dwyer (Corrado DeSantis, Derkkentz Geffrard, Rodney Green, Miguel Martinez), 3:22.03

4×800: Wellington (William Connors, Aubyn Gopie, Davon’tey Oliver, Kelvin Smith), 8:15.12

HONORABLE MENTION

Atlantic: David Calixte, Shamar Scruggs

Boca Raton: Ryan Vladimir

Boynton Beach: Bernard Blanks, Brandon Humphreys

Dr. Joaquin Garcia: Valbrun Vazhan

Dwyer: Wilthin Alcime, Corrado DeSantis, Tabari Mason, Tyler Nichols, Jalyn Price, Jordan Quince, Jayson Smith

John I. Leonard: Karlvin Montelus

Lake Worth: Andy Pompilus

Olympic Heights: Caio Miyake

Palm Beach Central: David Harmon, Antoine Sharp, Austin Wright

Palm Beach Gardens: Kevion Grant

Park Vista: Lucas Gambetta, Chris Gunterman, Justin Dewar

Santaluces: Dylan Michel, Jason Mompremier

Seminole Ridge: Zane Gordon, Darren Wingate

Spanish River: Elijah Rand, Anthony Toscano, Blake Wallace

Suncoast: Max Arthay

Wellington: Michael Guido, Tyree Pearson, Darryl Wrox

West Boca: Michael Gonzales

COACH OF THE YEAR Doug Horn, Track, Spanish River. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Doug Horn, Spanish River: Helped Sharks win the district title. “What may have first been considered a rebuilding year turned out to be a very strong season with a lot of balance between middle distance, hurdles, and pole vault. I credit our success this season to a great group of event coaches who developed young athletes into real competitors.”

 

Palm Beach 2A-1A boys track athlete of the year: Jackson Hamilton, Benjamin senior

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:53

Benjamin senior Jackson Hamilton knew how to pull off a huge encore.

Hamilton, the team captain, won the shot put and discus for the second consecutive year and helped Benjamin win its third straight boys Class 1A state track and field championship. He’s won seven gold medals in the past two years at state – four individual and three team.

Not a bad haul for someone who finished next to last in the discus in his freshman year.

“Even on the star-studded team that we had last year, Jackson was the anchor of that team,” said Benjamin track coach Barrett Saunders. “I knew this year, as long as we had Jackson giving us 20 points everywhere we went, we’d have a chance.”

The multiple-time All-American is the school-record holder in both events (shot put at 57-8 1/2 and discus at 180-11) and he has repeated as the Sun Sentinel track and field small-school boys athlete of the year. He was also a team captain for the Buccaneers’ football team.

“There definitely was pressure because I had won shot and discus in the state last year,” said Hamilton, who is signed with FSU. “All the eyes were on me this year, but I like pressure anyway. I was peaking at the right time, and I felt really good.”

For the last two years, he’s concentrated on throws after splitting time between football and track

“When I came to high school, I thought my thing would be football,” Hamilton said. “It ended up being discus and shot put. Even though we lost some guys (to graduation), we also picked up some guys. I think our strong point this year was our field events. We were good overall.”

Hamilton said this was also the most athletes they ever brought to the state meet, which contributed to the 41-point victory over the rest of the field.

“I am excited about the next chapter in my life,” Hamilton said. “It will be fun because I don’t know what to expect. It will be good. The Olympics would be good, but we’ll see when I get to college.”

Jackson Hamilton, All County track and field from Benjamin School, photographed on Tuesday, May 28, 2024 (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Palm Beach 2A-1A boys track and field first team, second team, honorable mention and coach of the year

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:52
FIRST TEAM Bradley Cooper, Track, Atlantic Christian Academy. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Bradley Cooper, Javelin, Atlantic Christian senior: Took second place at state with a personal-best throw of 168-4 in the javelin; won district and regional titles; also finished second in the county championships; also plays baseball.

Dallas Desouza, Track, Cardinal Newman. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Dallas Desouza, 400/800, Cardinal Newman senior: School-record holder in the 400 (47.52) and 800 (1:56.20), in addition to all relays (4×100, 4×200, 4×400, 4×800, and sprint medley); took third at 2A state meet in the 400 (PR) and was on second-place 4×400 relay.

Samuel Enamorado, Track , Atlantic Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Samuel Enamorado, High jump, Atlantic Christian freshman: Had a personal best in the high jump (6-4 ¾); took 11th at state; also had a best jump of 42-0 in the triple jump and 19-8 in the long jump; won the county title and district titles in the high jump, triple jump, and high jump, regional title in the high jump.

Jake Kissel, Track, Cardinal Newman. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jake Kissel, 800, Cardinal Newman junior: Team distance captain is the school-record holder in both the 4×400 and 4×800; the 4×800 team won the 2A state championship for the first time; runner-up at state in the 4×400 and ninth with a PR of 1:58.12 in the 800; had other PRs in 400 (51.78), 1,600 (4:35.44).

Robert Letsche, track, Benjamin. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Robert Letsche, Pole vault, Benjamin senior: The Western Colorado University signee smashed a 20-year-old school record of 14-4 in the pole vault by winning the Class 1A state title with a jump of 15-9; finished third last year at state with a jump of 12-9 ½.

Joe Licata, Track, Jupiter Christian. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Joe Licata, 400, Jupiter Christian sophomore: Team captain broke the school record for the 200 (22.51), 400 (48.58), 800 (1:58.02), and high jump (5-7 ¾); finished second at Class 1A state meet in the 400 with his PR; won districts and regionals.

Julian Luiz, Track, Benjamin. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Julian Luiz, 400 hurdles/long jump, Benjamin sophomore: School-record holder in 400 hurdles (54.28); fifth-place finish in 110 hurdles (15.13) and won the Class 1A state title in the 4×400 (3:19.90); also placed 15th at state in long jump, had a PR of 21-11 ¾.

Jacob Cosby-Mosley, Track, Benjamin. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Jacob Cosby-Mosley, 100 hurdles/triple jump, Benjamin senior: The Wake Forest football signee, a team captain, finished state runner-up in the 110 hurdles with a personal-best time of 14.96; also had personal-best long jump (21-10 ¾) at 1A state meet.

Seth Roque-Munoz, Track, FAU High. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Seth Roque-Munoz, 1,600/3,200, FAU junior: Had fastest time of 9:47.69 which was good enough for 11th in the 3,200 at the Class 2A state meet, and ran 4:34.71 (1600); school-record holder in both events.

Larry Warren, Track, Pahokee. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Larry Warren, 100, Pahokee sophomore: Finished in fourth place at state in 100 and was a member of the third-place 4×100 relay team; also placed 10th in the 200; best times of 10.79 (100); 22.12 (200); season highlight was running his PR in the 100; also plays football.

Mike Winfield, Track, Benjamin. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Mike Winfield, 400, Benjamin junior: Won state championship in the 400 and is a member of the school-record 4×400 and 4×800 relays; best times for 100 (11.29), 200 (22.26), 400 (48.48), and 800 (1:58.99); trimmed three seconds off his 400 time from last year.

King Bridgett, Somerset Canyons; 2024 Palm Spring All County First Team Class 2A-1A boys track. (King Bridgett /Courtesy)

King Bridgett, 200, Somerset Canyons senior: Came back from pulling his hamstring a week before districts to finish second in the 200 and went on to win the regionals and place ninth at state; set school record in the 200 (21.87); also ran 11.12 (100).

Landon Rapkiewicz, Benjamin; 2024 Palm Spring All County. (Benjamin Athletics /Courtesy)

Landon Rapkiewicz, Shot put/discus, Benjamin junior: Finished sixth at the 1A meet in the discus; had a best throw of 144-8 during the season; was 17th in the shot put with a best season throw of 43-1 ½ in placing fourth at the county meet.

Relays

4×100: Cardinal Newman (Jaylin Brown, Ethan Holland, Jyron Hughley, Xanai Scott), 42.23

4×400: Cardinal Newman (Lucas Hernandez-Truji, Jake Kissel, Jackson Miller, Dallas Desouza), 3:18.05

4×400: Benjamin (Joshua Luiz, Julian Luiz, Cooper Sukhu, Michael Winfield), 3:19.90

4×800: Cardinal Newman (Joshua Flynn, Lucas Hernandez-Truji, Jake Kissel, William Tuma),  7:48.08

SECOND TEAM

Elijah Arterburn, 1600/3200, Atlantic Christian freshman

Corey Bouie, Triple jump, Pahokee senior

Jean Brenley, Javelin, Atlantic Christian senior

Jaylin Brown, 100, Cardinal Newman junior

Brian Exume, 100 hurdles, Atlantic Christian junior

Jayden Fenelus, Long jump, Cardinal Newman junior

Micah Griffith, Pole vault, Benjamin senior

Da’Corrian Jones, 400, Pahokee freshman

Josh Luiz, 400 hurdles, Benjamin senior

Brennan King, Discus, Cardinal Newman junior

Tristan Stewart, 200, King’s Academy junior

Akim Thelemaque, High jump, King’s Academy freshman

Gage Wallace, Shot put, Benjamin junior

Relays

4×100: Pahokee (Calbert Edward, Willie Fitzgerald, Da’Corrian Jones, Larry Warren), 42.44

4×400: Pahokee (Xavier Bryant, Zaylen Bryant, Calbert Edward, Da’Corrian Jones), 3:23.66

4×800: Benjamin (Baron Ryba, Christian Balistreri, Michael Winfield, Cooper Sukhu), 8:02.78

HONORABLE MENTION

American Heritage-Delray: Maximo Gallego, Olangston St. Julian

Atlantic Christian: Brenley Jean, David Chuckwu, Felder Jacques, Joshua Jules, Javiel Ortiz, Jayden Russell

Benjamin: Jeron Atwater, Jacob Bounds, Stephen Cecil, Kaden Faniel, Phoenix Donghia, Jacob Halpern, Ronnie Parson, Robert Pierman, Chancellor Reddick, Christian Smith, Joshua Smith

Berean Christian: Drovinsky Ulysse

Cardinal Newman: Maximillian Redmond

Dreyfoos: Roodley Blaise

FAU High: Peter Antonucci, Carlos Santiago

Glades Day: DaCoby Wooten

Inlet Grove: Demarion Albert, Joden Black, Yohan Grantlin, Connor Thomas

King’s Academy: Edouard Edshawn, Phillip Griepenkerl, Hudson Gates, Tyce Porcher, Beckett Rash

Oxbridge Academy: Christopher Cano

Pahokee: Samuel Arnold, Xavier Bryant, Calbert Edward, Robert Johnson, Ma’Tavious Stinfort

St. Andrew’s: Finnley Pratt,  Trey Reiland, Jake Shore, Dylan Yowell

St. John Paul II Academy: Reuben Bain

Somerset Canyons: Maximus Brown, Jeremiah Lysus

CO-COACHES OF THE YEAR Carnell Coleman, Track, Cardinal Newman. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Carnell Coleman, Cardinal Newman: Led the Crusaders to the district title, regional runner-up, and seventh place at state in 2A. “Last year the team finished seventh at districts and did not place in the state. My goal was just to give the kids a chance to feel like a program and feel the success of champions.”

Barrett Saunders, Track, Benjamin. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Barrett Saunders, Benjamin: Guided Buccaneers to the county, regional, and 1A state champions for three straight years; district champions for five consecutive years and Palm League champions for a second straight season. “The team surpassed all my expectations. They not only won the big meets, but they also dominated them.”

 

Broward 4A-3A girls track athlete of the year: Christiana Coleman, Dillard senior

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:50

Dillard’s Christiana Coleman couldn’t have scripted a better final chapter for her senior year.

Coleman leaves as one of the most decorated track and cross country athletes in Broward County and the icing on the cake came at the 3A state track championships at the University of North Florida Hodges Stadium in Jacksonville.

The University of Florida signee ran personal-best times in winning the 1,600 (4:53.58), and the 3,200 (10:50.88) to help Dillard’s girls win the team state championship and end the 14-year reign of Miami Northwestern. The last time Dillard’s girls won the state title was in 1978.

“It was perfect,” said Coleman, who had also run a 2:12.86 PR in the 800. Dillard coach Davidson Gill, however, opted to rest his star distance runner to maximize their chances at the state championship. “I was happy I was able to be fresh running the 1,600 and 3,200. It paid off. I was happy when he told me I didn’t have to run the 800. It was great to win the state cross country title and turn around and do the same thing for track.”

Coleman, who was named the Sun Sentinel runner of the year in the fall after also winning the state cross country title with a personal-best time of 17:53.40 in Tallahassee. It also resulted in a team state championship. Coleman started running in the seventh grade and would run with the high schoolers. This year, she got extra workouts in running with the boys’ team.

“I expected to be able to do this because I did well running in middle school,” Coleman said. “I knew that I had nothing but time to get better. This journey has definitely been fun all of these years. I see myself in a lot of the girls who are in middle school at Dillard, and I tried to mentor and motivate them.”

Gill said Coleman was a foundational piece for both programs.

“Storybook ending to a long career with four state championships (1 cross country and 3 track),” Gill said. “She was an instrumental part of bringing a state championship back to Dillard High School.

“Chris was a silent leader who led by example with her work ethic and her consistency to be perfect in her workouts and everyone followed,” Gil added.

Christiana Coleman, All County track and field from Dillard High School, photographed on Tuesday, May 28, 2024 (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Broward 4A-3A girls track and field first team, second team, honorable mention and coach of the year

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:49
FIRST TEAM Samara Bruce, Track, Dillard. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Samara Bruce, LJ, Dillard senior: School-record holder in the long jump (17 feet, 10.25 inches), and ran a 12.32-second time in the 100-meter dash; helped school win first girls state title since 1978; considering LSU; also participated in volleyball and cheerleading.

Anya Carey, Track, Somerset Academy. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Anya Carey, TJ, Somerset Academy senior: Team captain won five district championships in the triple jump; won Class 3A state championship in triple jump (39-5 3/4) and also did the long jump (17-7 1/2) and both are school records.

Sienna Alvarez-Coia, Track, American Heritage. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Sienna Alvarez-Coia, 1,600/3,200, American Heritage senior: Captain of the distance team for track and set school record in the 1,600 at state (4:57.39) in finishing third; took third at state in the 3,200 and had a best time of (11:00.42); first-time state qualifier dropped 31 seconds in the 1,600 and one minute in the 3,200.

Patchnalie Compere, Track, Northeast High. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Patchnalie Compere, 100/200, Northeast junior: Team captain won the BCAA track meet in both the 100 (11.65) and the 200 (23.83); finished second in the 200 and third in the 100 at the Class 3A state meet; set two personal marks in the events; also played basketball at the school.

Raquel Edwards, track, Dillard. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Raquel Edwards, 800, Dillard senior: The UCF signee said career highlight was being on the school-record 4×400 and 4×800 relay; ran 800 (2:13.92); finished fifth at state in the 800 and helped her team to state title.

Desiree Frazier, Track, Boyd Anderson. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Desiree Frazier, 400 hurdles, Boyd Anderson sophomore: Owns the school record in the 400 (54.41) where she finished second at the state 3A meet; also finished sixth in the 100 (11.83).

Callia Harris, Track, Flanagan. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Callia Harris, HJ, Flanagan senior: The Ohio State commit recovered from an injury to become the school-record holder in the high jump (5-1 3/4); also competed in the 100 (12.08), 200 (24.38), 400 (57.08); most proud of the progress she made since her freshman year.

Alayna Herring, Track St. Thomas Aquinas. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Alayna Herring, Javelin, St. Thomas Aquinas senior: School-record holder, 3-time state qualifier, 4-time district champion; placed 11th at Class 4A state meet with a throw of 109-5; also, a weightlifter.

Ashlyn Hubbard, Pole Vault, St. Thomas Aquinas. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Ashlyn Hubbard, PV, St. Thomas Aquinas senior: Best pole vault was 10-9; finished 12th at state; won pole vault at Louis Bing invitational, Sam Burley invitational, Walter Dix Relays, Districts and Regionals; also did long jump with a PR of 14-4.

Lauren Kirby, Track, Somerset Academy. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Lauren Kirby, Discus, Somerset Academy junior: Class 3A state champ in shot put and discus; has PRs of 43-9 (shot) and 158-8 (discus); won state in discus last year; won Nike Indoor Nationals Shot Put Showcase; ranked No. 2 high school shot putter in nation; also competes in basketball, and martial arts.

Alexia Reid, Track, Dillard. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Alexia Reid, 100 hurdles/400 hurdles, Dillard junior: Claimed school record in the 100 hurdles (13.72) at state meet where she finished second and ran a 1:02.24 in the 400 hurdles in winning the BCAA meet; also placed second at the state in the 400 hurdles; has nation’s fourth-best time in 400 hurdles.

Lauren Thomas, St. Thomas Aquinas; 2024 Broward Spring All County First Team Class 4A-3A girls track. (St. Thomas Aquinas/Courtesy)

Lauren Thomas, Discus/Shot, St. Thomas Aquinas senior: Finished third at state in the discus (139-7), and also won the district and second in the region; had personal-best throws in the discus (147-4) and shot put (35-2); top three finishes all four years at state, including a win in the 2021 Class 4A state meet.

Evoto 2024 Broward Spring All County First Team: Grace Finneran, St. Thomas Aquinas; 2024 Broward Spring All County First Team girls Class 4A-3A track. (St. Thomas Aquinas/Courtesy)

Grace Finneran, 800/1,600, St. Thomas Aquinas junior: Finished sixth at Class 4A state championships in the 1,600 and 13th at state in the 800; was second in the 1,600 at BCAA meet; won the region 1,600 and runner-up in the 800; best marks were 5:00.74 (1,600), and 2:15.65 (800).

Relays

4×100: St. Thomas Aquinas (Arianna Allen, Jordyn Downing, Kelyse Jackson, Shanel Morgan), 47.01

4×400: Dillard (Darianne Christian, Shynah Collins, Raquel Edwards, Alexia Reid), 3:45.30

4×800: Dillard (Christiana Coleman, Shynah Collins, Raquel Edwards, Abigail Richards), 8:49.73

SECOND TEAM

Zayan Adrien, High jump, Somerset Academy junior

Ajah Arscott, 100, Taravella senior

Shynah Collins, 400, Dillard seventh grader

Miley Gil, 3200, Dillard seventh grader

Kelyse Jackson, 400 hurdles, St. Thomas Aquinas junior

Skye Jackson, 200, South Plantation

Gah’Laysia King, Triple jump, Somerset Academy seventh grader

Regan Morrall, 1600, Western senior

Abigail Richards, 800, Dillard sophomore

Amaiya Samuel, 100 hurdles, American Heritage senior

Elizabeth Sauby, Javelin, Pine Crest freshman

Jade Shakir, Shot put/discus, Dillard senior

Riana Wilford, Pole vault, Dillard senior

Relays

4×100: Dillard (Aylannah Baker, Jamaya Cobb, Jakayla Mckennie, Princess Webb), 47.09

4×400: St. Thomas Aquinas (Arianna Allen, Aisha Hane, Kelyse Jackson, Shanel Morgan), 3:48.75

4×800: Flanagan (Kylee Louis, Briauna Morency, Melania Hernaiz Narvaez, Emma Schubert), 9:47.15

HONORABLE MENTION

American Heritage: Rachari Wildgoose

Archbishop McCarthy: Helen Ribas

Boyd Anderson: Briana McDonald

Cooper City: Madeleine De Lacoste,

Coral Springs: Shaquilea Alvaranga, Za’coria Anestal, Trinety Dajuste, Olivia Higgins

Coral Glades: Camille Camper, Zion Tomlin

Cypress Bay: Fabiana Bello, Hannah Compton

Deerfield Beach: Larrisa Francois

Dillard: Darianne Christian, Princess Webb

Flanagan: Lenee Barbary, Janae Jones, Kylee Louis, Melania Hernaiz Narvaez

Fort Lauderdale: Sariyah Lewis, Makayla King, Taylor Powell, Amaia Vadillo

Miramar: JoJo Modile

Northeast: Ri’Niya Jean-Baptiste, Isabel Solcombe

St. Thomas Aquinas: Alexi Arocho, Ariyanna Griggs, Aisha Hane, Kelyse Jackson

Jasmine Morgan, Shanel Morgan, Faith Bennett-Page, Gabrielle Pridgen, Simone Souvenir

Somerset Academy: Rhema Cruse-Chipman, Shanoya Reid

Stoneman Douglas: Sophia Zengotita

Northeast: Miashie Jean, Abigail Mullings

Taravella: Qyrah Spann-Pierre

Western: Aaysia Williams

COACH OF THE YEAR Davidson Gill, Track, Dillard. Spring All-County in Deerfield Beach on Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

Davidson Gill, Dillard: Guided Panthers to girls state track championship for the first time since 1976 and 1978, and in the process ended the 14-year stranglehold that Miami Northwestern had at state. “We overcame adversity daily and pushed forward to accomplish the biggest goal in team history. I am proud of everything coming together for my senior class to win the state championship.”

 

Broward 2A-1A girls track athlete of the year: Alexa Schwartz, North Broward Prep junior

South Florida Local News - Fri, 06/14/2024 - 01:48

Alexa Schwartz, in just her second season throwing the javelin, was lights-out at the Class 2A state championships at the University of North Florida Hodges Stadium in Jacksonville.

The North Broward Prep junior, who finished second at state last year, improved her performance by a considerable margin, adding 20 feet to her total for a school-record 147 feet, 3 inches. At state, she was just 8 inches off the state record set by Shorecrest Prep’s Sonoma Kasica last year. Schwartz helped North Broward Prep finish in a tie for 16th.

“I knew what (the record) was going in and I really did want to beat it and get my name up there and fell a little short,” added Schwartz, who also was an All-County first-team basketball selection for the Eagles. She won states by 25 feet this year. “I’m confident that next year I’ll be able to get it. I am proud of the work I put in and even though I am relatively new to the sport to have this result and have other people recognize you is great.”

 

North Broward Prep coach John Garrish said Schwartz was key in the school winning its first district title in addition to sending a school-record 13 athletes to state.

“Alexa is more than just our captain, state champion, and record holder,” Garrish said. “She has absolutely transcended our program and school in every way.  She is the person our young students look to for guidance and an example of what a scholar-athlete should be.  She works tirelessly on the runway and basketball court and challenges herself just as much in the weight room and classroom. Without her, I’m certain we wouldn’t have won our first district championship, and our program wouldn’t be in the position that it is today.”

Alexa Schwartz, All County track and field from North Broward Prep, photographed on Tuesday, May 28, 2024 (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

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